Tag Archives: metaphor

Why not a Proust-themed transmedia work?

Why a Proust transmedia world

This semester, I am taking Jesse Schell’s Game Design class. He did a lecture on transmedia, which has recently become something of a buzzword. In his lecture, he mentioned several examples of transmedia worlds, like Peter Pan, Sherlock Holmes or even Tolkien, that were created long before the concept of transmedia itself. Peter Pan is particularly notable, as it was first a short story, then a play and then a novel. It was transmedia in the nineteenth century. This is true of others works, but Peter Pan is very noticeable in this regard. As Jesse was explaining this, my mind went straight to Proust. Proust definitely created a world. It is deep, it if fictional, and it has another criterion that Jesse brought up: it makes some wishes come true. Most of all, it is huge. It may not seem like it at first, but it really is gigantic. A partial list of characters available on line just begins to show the depth and subletly of Proust’s world, how it is multilayered and how every small piece has meaning. Unlike the other worlds that Jesse showed, Proust’s world does not have supernatural elements, but, very much like Star Wars, or Tolkien, there is a deep, meaningful philosophy present throughout the whole narrative, the philosophy of the two “ways,” Swann’s Way and the Guermantes Way, what they mean, how they relate, who fits in which and how they can be applied.

The number of pages that compose The Remembrance of Things Past varies from one edition to the next, of course, but the estimate that’s given most of the time is three thousand pages. That’s if you stick to one version. The last three volumes, composed of the “Albertine novels,” The Captive and The Fugitive, as well as the seventh and final volume, Time Regained, are posthumous and unfinished, that’s why they’re only about two hundred pages each. What makes it into the final book depends on the editor, and of all the current French editions, each picks a slightly different variation. I’m not sure where to show sources for this assertion, as I personally stuck to the Gallimard versions, but I heard this from a Proust expert, Pascal Fouché. The Pleiade edition, also from Gallimard, is supposed to have all known variations.

But the variety of versions for a single, huge, coherent world does fit within Jesse’s definition of a world suitable for transmedia. At note about the “coherent” part: Proust’s story is notoriously incoherent, particularly when it comes to time. Time is basically “bent” in Proust. In the first volume, the narrator remembers seeing a woman whom he refers to as “the lady in pink” when he was about ten years old and was visiting a philandering uncle of his. Spoiler alert: the lady in pink is, a few volumes later, revealed to be none other than Mrs. Swann. But, by that time, it is also made clear that Gilberte Swann is the same age as narrator, so when the narrator saw the lady in pink at the age of 10, Gilberte was also 10 years old and at that time Mrs Swann was married and no longer called on single gentlemen at all. So really the narrator, at the age of ten, was visiting the version of Mrs Swann from several years before he was born. This point is never made explicitly, but such inconsistencies do not stand out it Proust. The story of The Rememberance of Things Past is made to be as vague as possible and these details, more than anything, give it an organic texture, like something you’d remember but that is on the tip of your tongue. And three thousand pages long.

The idea of a transmedia world that has in inconsistent story is not that unusual. The canon of Star Wars varies from one medium to the next: there are in fact several “levels of canon” for Star Wars. And Doctor Who has an immensely incoherent story. One of the writers, either Russel T Davies or Stephen Moffat (I’ll admit I don’t remember which one) actually recently said that it doesn’t really matter if the story of Doctor Who is consistent: you can always explain that the timeline has changed because of some sort of time travel. What was important was for the world to be consistent. And in that measure, Star Wars, Doctor Who and Proust all pass.

At the time of writing, the slides for last lecture were not up, and I was relying on them to see how much Proust followed Jesse’s guidelines for a good transmedia world. But at the time, when i was looking at the list on the screen, I was thinking, “That’s pretty much it.” So what’s missing?

Simplicity and transcedance

I’d say that what’s missing is simplicity and transcendance. Proust has neither of those. There are no situations in Proust where the social interactions or personal goals are streamlined to something that can be stated in one sentence. Anything in Proust requires explanations of several pages made of extremely long sentences. Some paragraphs go on for several pages. Proust is, if anything, complex. As for transcendence, there really isn’t any either. I don’t know if transcendence in that context actually means a supernatural element. I don’t think so. But whatever transcendence means, Proust’s world doesn’t have it. The greatest thing his characters can aspire to is some sort of underappreciated artistic achievement and a tiny bit of social mobility. M. Bontemps is gently mocked in the narration at some point because he is a simple diplomat and doesn’t know much about the finer things of life. An occupation that most people at the time as well as nowadays would consider a tremendous accomplishment is still no big thing in Proust’s world.

From then on, the question poses itself: is it a shortcoming of transmedia worlds that they require simplicity and transcendence? Pokémon definitely has it in every form. It is not a world as deep as Proust by any means. Harry Potter is a complex metaphor, but it falls short by the way it fails to address many important issues. The one that always disturbs me every time I think about it is that the wizards definitely have the ability to cure cancer and many other illnesses, they also have the ability to fix many of our social and economic problems. If the world of Harry Potter were to be taken literally, wouldn’t the whole wizard community be guilty of possibly criminal negligence towards muggles? That’s one of the attributes of simplicity and transcendence, the complexities of the real world don’t “map” into it. They do map into Proust.

So are such works, the transmedia works, the works that do embody the principles of simplicity and transcendence, are they inferior to more finite ones? If they are, is it by nature or only the current instances? And if it’s only the current instances, are deeper, more complex worlds about to come when the time is right and the public and maybe authors and technology ready for them?

That, I don’t know. Would Proust be making games today? Would Shakespeare? Maybe. It’s fun to extrapolate but not really useful. Maybe Proust, had he grown up in the seventies or eighties would have been reprimanded for being lazy and pretentious and given up on literature altogether and gone into banking. Who knows? But the question about how deeply simplicity and transcendence it tied to interaction is a serious one. And I have absolutely no clue as to where to start looking to answer it.